brunobellamy:

For Scotland and for freedom… a scottish-style miniskirt! :)

brunobellamy:

For Scotland and for freedom… a scottish-style miniskirt! :)

darkestdee:

© slight-art-obsession | ^(OvO)^

Léon Gimpel, Les Ballons, 1909

Léon Gimpel, Les Ballons, 1909

(Source: greg.org, via foto-jennic)

sabertoothbitch:

this is happening right now and it is beautiful

(via foto-jennic)

sabertoothbitch:

this is happening right now and it is beautiful

(via foto-jennic)

ryanpanos:

Scotland’s Big Decision | Via

Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.

(via foto-jennic)

ryanpanos:

Scotland’s Big Decision | Via

Tomorrow, legal residents of Scotland, ages 16 and older, will be voting in a referendum to decide their country’s independence from the United Kingdom. While ending a centuries-old union is a complex and emotional issue, the wording on the ballot could not be more simple — “Should Scotland be an independent country?” — with only two choices, yes or no. Interest in tomorrow’s vote is extremely high, and more than 97 percent of Scotland’s eligible voters are registered to vote. “No” voters had the edge in polls for most of the past year, but “Yes” voters surged ahead to take a brief lead just weeks ago. At the moment, polls favor a “No” vote, but the slim margin makes the outcome too close to call. As Scotland prepares to decide its future, here is a collection of images of the campaign, the voters, and the country.

(via foto-jennic)

(Source: hpstuffs, via yourpatronus)


by John Anster Fitzgerald

by John Anster Fitzgerald

(Source: myskinnybones, via evaxmarie)


Waves by (Reza Bassiri)

(Source: flightlesscas, via annejacques)

uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 

City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.

See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 

See all of our posts with GIFs

-Laura H.

uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Today we will take a walk through 1840’s Philadelphia with City Sights for Little Folks.  This book features illustrations of things you could expect to see on your journey through town, accompanied with brief descriptions and occasional rhymes.  For those of you interested in the history of print, this book was printed via stereotype, a  method of printing  developed in the 18th century to keep up with the rapidly rising demand for books.  With traditional handset type, printers ran into issues when numerous copies of the same text were needed in quick succession.  With movable, hand-set type the compositor had to arrange each word letter-by-letter on the press bed; when dealing with multiple machines running the same text, this method leaves room for lots of errors, and also requires huge volumes of standing type.  A stereotype is a metal cast of multiple forms of type, which can then be used on a press instead of a hand-assembled form.  That way, printers could use several stereotypes to print the same text quickly, without a huge need for more inventory or staff. Thus, this book is an interesting window into history.  It provides a child’s-eye view of Philadelphia in the mid-19th century, and also embodies a printing technology that was very popular and significant at the time. 

City Sights for Little Folks.  Philadelphia: Smith & Peck, 1845.  Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, Uncatalogued.

See all of our Miniature Monday’s posts 

See all of our posts with GIFs

-Laura H.

smithsonianlibraries:

About a year ago, we posted a gif of hover whales. This, however, was our original creation—at the time too big for Tumblr but now able to be posted.
from Suggestions to the keepers of the U.S. life-saving stations, light-houses, and light-ships; and to other observers, relative to the best means of collecting and preserving specimens of whales and porpoises. By Frederick W. True.
starrydiadems:

The Mystic Wood by John William Waterhouse (1914-17).

starrydiadems:

The Mystic Wood by John William Waterhouse (1914-17).

(via hjartastyrkur)

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